Andy Warhol and The Factory

Avant-garde artist Andy Warhol is known for his creative flair, and for turning every day objects—like the Campbell's soup can—into pop culture icons. With his signature silver hair, Warhol was at the epicenter of the cutting-edge New York...
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Avant-garde artist Andy Warhol is known for his creative flair, and for turning every day objects—like the Campbell's soup can—into pop culture icons. With his signature silver hair, Warhol was at the epicenter of the cutting-edge New York...

Avant-garde artist Andy Warhol is known for his creative flair, and for turning every day objects—like the Campbell's soup can—into pop culture icons. With his signature silver hair, Warhol was at the epicenter of the cutting-edge New York City art world starting in the 1960s. Though he was primarily a visual artist and filmmaker, Warhol attracted celebrities and artists of all kinds to The Factory. The studio became a magnet for hipsters, artists and socialites, and a hub for experimentation of all kinds. It was located in midtown Manhattan on E. 47th St. for years, before moving to Union Square in 1968. Over time, The Factory became the "go to" place to be for the glitterati. Today, on the 25th anniversary of Warhol's passing, we look at some of the most famous figures to step into the artist's legendary salon.

Lou Reed

Lou Reed

The Factory was a breeding ground for all kinds of experimental art, including music. The legendary rock band The Velvet Underground, with key members Lou Reed and John Cale, were central to Warhol's scene at The Factory. Adorned in black, and performing songs with such titles as "Venus in Furs," The Velvet Underground became a cult favorite when they performed as part of Warhol's multimedia show, Exploding Plastic Inevitable, in 1966-1967. Warhol connected the Velvets with the German-born singer Nico, who contributed vocals to their debut album, The Velvet Underground & Nico. Now considered a classic, the album cover was designed by Warhol, and featured a yellow banana sticker adorned with the words "Peel slowly and see."

Edie Sedgwick

Edie Sedgwick

Among the most well-known figures associated with The Factory was the actress, heiress and model Edith "Edie" Sedgwick. Edie Sedgwick started visiting The Factory regularly in 1965. Warhol quickly saw her appeal, and helped catapult her to celebrity status by casting her in his avant-garde films including Vinyl (his reinterpretation of Anthony Burgess's novel A Clockwork Orange) as well as Poor Little Rich Girl and Kitchen. With short hair spray-painted silver to match Warhol's look, Sedgwick became known for her fashionable style, which included leotards, short dresses and large, dangling earrings. For her larger-than-life demeanor, Warhol nicknamed her "Superstar." Sadly, Sedgwick died of an overdose in 1971, at the age of 28.

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan

By the time The Factory started to gain notoriety, Bob Dylan was already a huge star in the music world. Dylan, Mick Jagger and other musicians stopped by The Factory from time to time to check out the latest avant-garde happenings and participate in the non-stop atmosphere of creativity. Dylan paid a famous visit to The Factory in 1965. Photographer Nat Finklestein, in his book The Factory Years: 1964-1967 notes that people anxiously awaited Dylan's announced visit with "Bobby's coming, Bobby's coming." As a parting gift, Warhol gave Dylan one of his classic double images of Elvis.

Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí and Andy Warhol were both artists and eccentrics to the core. The Surrealist Dalí, never one to miss out on an outrageous scene, visited The Factory and had several meetings with Warhol. One Factory regular, known as Ultra Violet, had previously dated Dalí and became magnetized to Warhol's scene, in just one of many connections between the artists. In one classic meeting between the two at the St. Regis Hotel in 1965 that was captured in an iconic photo, Dalí placed an Inca headdress on Warhol's head. Warhol, who rarely drank, was sipping wine to relax his nerves around the theatrical Dalí.

Betsey Johnson

Betsey Johnson

Today, Betsey Johnson is known worldwide for her fashion designs, and her signature, off-beat style. But few know that Johnson was a regular in Andy Warhol's Factory scene in the 1960s. Johnson had became a Manhattan "It" girl after she won a contest to be a Guest Editor for Mademoiselle magazine. She upped her caché at The Factory, where she mingled with The Velvet Underground (she was briefly married to John Cale), Edie Sedgwick and others. Today, Johnson has over 65 stores throughout the world.