Ruben Cavazos

Ruben Cavazos Biography.com

Organized Crime(1957–)
During his reign as international president of the Mongols Motorcycle Club, Ruben Cavazos expanded the group's membership by recruiting local street thugs with affiliations to the Mexican Mafia.

Synopsis

Following a deadly brawl between the Hells Angels and Mongols motorcycle clubs in 2002, Ruben "Doc" Cavazos came to national prominence. During his reign as the Mongols' president, he expanded the club's membership by recruiting local street thugs with affiliations to the Mexican Mafia. According to federal agents, his aim was to take on the Hells Angels and run a massive criminal enterprise engaged in drug running, murder and intimidation. But Cavazos's power grab came with consequences. Many Mongols would later say that his hunger for fame was his ultimate downfall, driving him to turn on his brothers.

Background

Raised by his father in Highland Park, a suburb of Los Angeles, California, Ruben Cavazos became a members of an L.A.-based Mexican-American street gang known as the Avenues at a young age. Not long after, he joined the Mongols Motorcycle Club (also known as the Mongol Nation or Mongol Brotherhood—a group long-associated with organized crime in California. By this time, Cavazos was going by the nickname "Doc"—a moniker he had been given for his more publicly known role as a licensed radiology technician. Not long into his run with the gang, Cavazos was named a chapter leader. He later became its international president.

President of the Mongols Motorcycle Club

Following a deadly brawl between the Hells Angels and Mongols motorcycle clubs in 2002, Ruben "Doc" Cavazos came to national prominence. Not only was he regarded as one of the Mongols' most notorious members, Cavazos is credited with transforming the club into one of the largest gangs on the West Coast.

During his reign as the Mongols' international president, Cavazos expanded the club's membership by recruiting local street thugs with affiliations to the Mexican Mafia. According to federal agents, his aim was to take on the Hells Angels and run a massive criminal enterprise engaged in drug running, murder and intimidation. But Cavazos's power grab came with consequences. During his time in charge, agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives infiltrated the club and piled on evidence for a federal racketeering indictment. Many Mongols would later say that Cavazos's hunger for fame was his ultimate downfall, eventually driving him to turn on his brothers.

Downfall

In August 2008, Cavazos was voted out of the Mongols Motorcycle Club following speculation that he was stealing from the gang and directly provoking members of the Mexican Mafia.

Just months later, in the fall of 2008—the result of a three-year investigation by federal agents—authorities arrested Cavazos along with more than 30 other Mongos in a sting operation known as "Operation Black Rain," which included a raid of Cavazos's home in West Covina, California.

Following his arrest, Cavazos was charged with racketeering. He pleaded guilty and received a 14-year prison sentence.

Cavazos's autobiography, entitled Honor Few, Fear None: The Life & Times of a Mongol, was published in June 2008.

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