Robert Altman

Robert Altman Biography.com

Director(1925–2006)
Filmmaker Robert Altman is best known for his highly individualistic films and use of simultaneous layers of dialogue.

Synopsis

Robert Altman's first hit as a director was M*A*S*H. He went on to direct a series of highly individualistic films, noted especially for their simultaneous layers of dialogue. Impatient with Hollywood's conservative and commercial approach to film-making, he moved to Europe. He received an Oscar for Lifetime Achievement at the 2005 Academy Awards.

Film Career

Film director Robert Atman was born in Kansas City, Missouri, on February 20, 1925. After serving in World War II as a pilot, he took up writing for radio and magazines, then produced industrial films. His first feature film was The Delinquents (1957). He gained instant recognition for M*A*S*H (1970), and went on to direct and/or produce a series of highly individualistic films, noted especially for their simultaneous layers of dialogue.

Impatient with Hollywood's conservative and commercial approach to filmmaking, he moved to Europe, although he returned to America to make such films as Nashville (1975), The Player (1991, BAFTA), Short Cuts (1993), Kansas City (1996), Cookie's Fortune (1998) and Dr T. and the Women (2000). Gosford Park (2001, Golden Globe Best Director) was his first British film. He received an Oscar for Lifetime Achievement at the 2005 Academy Awards.

Death

Altman died November 20, 2006 of undisclosed causes. Altman is survived by his wife Kathryn Reed and five children.

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