John P. Marquand

John P. Marquand Biography.com

Author(1893–1960)
Many of John P. Marquand's novels examined the upper class of New England. He also authored the popular Mr. Moto mysteries beginning in the 1930s.

Synopsis

John P. Marquand was born November 10, 1893, in Wilmington, Delaware. With the success of his first novel, The Unspeakable Gentleman (1922), he devoted himself to his creative writing pursuits, including short stories. The first Mr. Moto mystery, No Hero, was published in 1935. In 1937 he published The Late George Apley, a satire of New England upper crust, which earned him a Pulitzer Prize.

Profile

Writer, novelist. Born on November 10, 1893, in Wilmington, Delaware. Many of John P. Marquand's novels examined the upper class of New England. He also authored the popular Mr. Moto mysteries beginning in the 1930s. Marquand spent some of his early years in Rye, New York, before moving to Massachusetts as a teenager. He studied at Harvard University, graduating in 1915.

After college, Marquand worked for a Boston magazine before serving in the U.S. Army during World War I. Returning home, he worked for a journalist and a copywriter. With the success of his first novel, The Unspeakable Gentleman (1922), he devoted himself to his creative writing pursuits, including short stories. His stories as well as serializations of his novels appeared in numerous magazines, including The Saturday Evening Post and Cosmopolitan.

The first Mr. Moto mystery, No Hero, was published in 1935. Throughout the series, Mr. Moto was portrayed as a Japanese aristocrat with a talent for espionage. The books proved popular and were even made into films in the 1930s. By the end of this decade, Marquand began satirizing New England's upper crust with such works as The Late George Apley (1937). This work earned him a great literary honor ?? the Pulitzer Prize in 1938. Other well-known works by Marquand include H. M. Pulham, Esquire (1941) and Sincerely, Willis Wade (1955).

Married twice, Marquand had a son and a daughter with first wife Christina Sedgwick. In 1936, he married his second wife Adelaide Hooker. The couple had two sons and a daughter together, but divorced about two years before his death. John P. Marquand died of a heart attack on July 16, 1960, in Newburyport, Massachusetts.

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