Barry Mills

Barry Mills Biography.com

Drug Dealer, Murderer, Organized Crime
Barry "The Baron" Mills is the longtime leader of the white-supremacist prison gang the Aryan Brotherhood Mills, and is reportedly responsible for at least 14 murders.

Synopsis

Barry "The Baron" Mills found his calling as the leader of the white-supremacist prison gang the Aryan Brotherhood. He is reportedly responsible for at least 14 murders that occurred over the course of nearly two decades, though he's been in prison for most of his life. In one of the largest capital-punishment cases in U.S. history, in 2006, Mills was convicted of inciting a race riot at a Pennsylvania prison that left two black inmates dead. He managed to avoid the death penalty, and is currently serving a prison sentence of four consecutive life terms without the possibility of parole at the United States Penitentiary Administrative Maximum Facility Prison in Colorado.

Leader of the Aryan Brotherhood

Born in 1948 and hailing from Windsor, California, Barry Mills, also known as "The Baron," found his calling as the leader of the white-supremacist prison gang the Aryan Brotherhood. Mills is reportedly responsible for at least 14 murders that occurred over the course of nearly two decades, even though he has been in prison most of his life.

According to federal prosecutors, Mills has been jailed for most of his life, beginning in 1969 following an armed robbery conviction. He reportedly became a member of the AB while he was incarcerated at California's San Quentin State Prison (where the AB reportedly originated in the early 1960s).

Race War Against the D.C. Blacks

In 1997, Mills and his right hand-man, Tyler Bingham, ordered their members to carry out a race war against a rival prison gang, the D.C. Blacks. A race riot ensued at a prison in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, during which two black inmates were killed.

Immediately after the war, high-ranking AB member Alan Benton provided the big break in the case when he decided to leave the AB behind and cooperate with the federal government.

2006 Trial, Conviction and Sentencing

Armed with plenty of informants, prosecutors had the tools they needed to charge Mills and 39 others in March 2006, in one of the largest capital-punishment cases in U.S. history. Along with other members of the AB, Mills was indicted on various charges, including conspiracy, drug-trafficking, racketeering and murder. Mills was convicted of a number of charges, including inciting a race riot—making him eligible for the death penalty.

After a jury deadlocked on the death penalty, in November 2006, a 58-year-old Mills received an automatically imposed prison sentence of four consecutive life terms without the possibility of parole. He is currently serving his sentence at the United States Penitentiary Administrative Maximum Facility Prison in Florence, Colorado.

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