Ray Bradbury Dead at 91

Ray Bradbury, the iconic science-fiction writer of Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles, died Tuesday night at his Los Angeles home, reports USA Today. He was 91.   Despite a stroke that forced him to use a wheelchair in recent years, the Illinois-born...
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Ray Bradbury, the iconic science-fiction writer of Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles, died Tuesday night at his Los Angeles home, reports USA Today. He was 91.   Despite a stroke that forced him to use a wheelchair in recent years, the Illinois-born...
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Ray Bradbury, the iconic science-fiction writer of Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles, died Tuesday night at his Los Angeles home, reports USA Today. He was 91. Despite a stroke that forced him to use a wheelchair in recent years, the Illinois-born Bradbury kept active, writing screenplays, novels, plays, and poetry from his basement office in Los Angeles. When he wasn't working on his projects, he was attending literary fundraisers and making bookstore appearances around the city. Recipient of the U.S. National Medal of Arts, Bradbury wrote in a variety of genres—horror, mystery, humor—and extended himself into writing for television and films. "What I have always been is a hybrid author," Bradbury said in 2009. "I am completely in love with movies...and I am completely in love with libraries." In 1953 Bradbury released his most famous and according to him, "only true science-fiction work," Fahrenheit 451, in which he predicted electronic books, iPods, interactive television, and more technologies that are in use today. "I'm not afraid of machines," Bradbury told Writer's Digest in 1976. "I don't think the robots are taking over. I think the men who play with toys have taken over. And if we don't take the toys out of their hands, we're fools." Although he held out as long as possible, Bradbury reluctantly relinquished the rights to his most acclaimed novel in late 2011, allowing it to become digitized. However, his publisher, Simon & Schuster, promised the author that it would make an exception and allow the e-book to be available to libraries for patrons to download. Bradbury lives on through his four daughters. His wife of 56 years, Marguerite Bradbury, died in 2003.